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Rice in indian culture

Rice in indian culture
20
Nov

Proverb related to rice

Rogi bayasiddu haaluanna vaidya heliddu haaluanna”

          Literal: A patient longed for milk and rice and the doctor prescribed him milk and rice.

20
Nov

Proverb related to rice in Kannada

  

“Akki mele aase nenatara mele preeti”

          Literal: “Desire over rice; love over relatives”. If one does not like to spend the rice he has at home but is equally interested in serving his quest/relatives well, one faces a dilemma.

          Meaning: This is used to describe the dilemma that people sometimes face when they have to give up something they like in order to obtain another item. When the objects are to have but only one can be had. The dilemma one faces is described with this gaade.

18
Aug

Kati-puja

1. Kati-puja is a festival in Goalpara district of Assam. The folk God of Goalpara, Kati or Kartikeya is the God of fertility and human fecundity. He is the giver of sons and crops especially rice crop.
2. The Hudum puja prevalent in Goalpara region is observed by the. village folk. Hudum. according to a belief current in Goalpara region, IS a ram giver deity.

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Kati Bihu

1. The Kati Bihu held in autumn with great significance concerning protection of rice crop in the field. The Kati-Bihu marks the completion of sowing and transplanting of rice (Barua, 1957).
2. In some areas of Darrang, Assam it is also known as Ada-Bihu another aspect of Kati Bihu is that the ploughman does certain things For the protection of his crop.
3. He plants a small bamboo in the field and lights an earthen lamp at its foot. He may also whirl a piece of bamboo and chant certain mantras to protect the maturing rice crop from insect pests.

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu

1. The winter festival - Magh Bihu or Domahi of Assamese is a festival of enjoyment. It is post-harvest winter festival. It marks the gathering of harvest (Barua, 1957).
2. Magh Bihu is also known as Bhogali Bihu or the Bihu of enjoyment. A fire ceremony is closely associated with Magh Bihu, but more significant is Uruka- the Bihu eve (Goswami,1995).

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Bohag Bihu or Rangali Bihu

1. Bohag Bihu may be aptly called either a spring festival or New Year festival and this is a festival of joy and merriment although Various preparations of rice are made to celebrate it, the intensity of eatables is, however, not as prominent as that of Magh Bihu. Bohag Bihu is celebrated by all the communities in different names such as Baisagu by the Bodo-Kacharis, Baikho by the Rabhas, AIi-ai-ligang by the Misings, Bisu by the Deuri-Chutyas, Busu by the Dimasas etc. (Datta et al., 1994).

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Bihu festival

The Bihu festival is celebrated in different seasons:
(a) Bohag Bihu or Rangali Bihu is performed in the spring season (before sowing! transplanting of rice), in the month of April;
(b) Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu is celebrated in the winter season (after harvest of rice), in the month of January and
(c) Kati Bihu or Kangali Bihu is celebrated in the autumn season (when rice plants are in milking stage) in the month of October.

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Festivals of Assam

1. Busu festival
2. Bihu
3. Lakhimi Chapoa or Lahkimi Puja and Na-khowa
4. Kati-puja

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Proverbs and wise sayings in relation to rice

'Bhator tita khabo pari kintu mator tita sahibo noari'
(Food items with bitter taste can be eaten (with rice)
But bitter words cannot be endured)

'Jar dhan ache, tar sah ache
Jar dhan nai, tar man nai'
(If you have a good store of rice, you have courage;
If you have no stock (of rice), you have no prestige)

'Jar dhan nai, tar jat nai
Jar dhan ache, tar man ache'

(If you have no rice, you have no caste
If you have rice, you have prestige)
‘ Tomar barir bahn gaj, tare karisho kharisa
Tomate salai dhan don loun, kathato mon korisa'

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Folk songs of Assam

An old khasi song sung on the occasion ofjhum cultivation by
mixed group of men and women -
'Three times with a hoe we dig the earth
And three times we dance in a chain
With the hoe in both our left and right hands'
In a ballad of a young Assamese wife's sorrow who is ill treated
by her in-laws (Goswami, 1970)-
'Never did I have a kindly word ...

Sitting in the morning sun I cured banana spadix,
Even then my little brother was given only rice
Oh my dear
Even then my little brother was given only rice'
A ballad of Dimasa -Kachari known as 'The ballad of Johaya'-

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Folk Song4

File Courtesy: 
RARS,Karjat
18
Aug

Folk Song3

File Courtesy: 
RARS,Karjat
18
Aug

Folk Songs

File Courtesy: 
RARS,Karjat
18
Aug

Folk Songs

File Courtesy: 
RARS,Karjat
18
Aug

Folk songs

An old khasi song sung on the occasion ofjhum cultivation by
mixed group of men and women -
'Three times with a hoe we dig the earth
And three times we dance in a chain
With the hoe in both our left and right hands'
In a ballad of a young Assamese wife's sorrow who is ill treated
by her in-laws (Goswami, 1970)-
'Never did I have a kindly word ...

Sitting in the morning sun I cured banana spadix,
Even then my little brother was given only rice
Oh my dear
Even then my little brother was given only rice'
A ballad of Dimasa -Kachari known as 'The ballad of Johaya'-

File Courtesy: 
ICAR, NEH. Umiam
18
Aug

Festivals of Nagaland

There are different tribes in Nagaland and all the tribes celebrate various festivals in different seasons of the year. Though the festivals are associated with their traditional religious beliefs, the festivals of Nagaland appear to be, by and large, agriculture in colour and tone (Datta at el., 1994).

File Courtesy: 
ICAR, NEH. Umiam
18
Aug

Festivals of Mizoram

1. The community festivals of the Mizos are called Kut. Pawl Kut may be called a harvest festival. It is performed at the end of harvest held in the month of December.

2. On the other hand, it may be called a new year's festival. The aim of the festival is to bid farewell to the old year and to welcome the New Year.
3. Chapchar Kut is a festival of spring performed generally in the month of March or April. The festival is generally performed before the jhums are burnt.

File Courtesy: 
ICAR, NEH. Umiam
18
Aug

Festivals of Meghalaya

1. The Garos of Meghalaya observe different festivals m the different seasons of the year.

2. Most of the festivals current amongst the Garos are associated with cultivation. Before the sowing of seeds of rice, they celebrate two festivals known as Gitehi pong and Michiltata The first is a personal sacrifice and the second was the collective ceremony.

3. To ensure the favour of the sprit Rokime i.e., mother of rice she is invoked in these two festivals. The Rongchugala or Gindigala festival is observed before the starting of harvest.

File Courtesy: 
ICAR, NEH. Umiam
18
Aug

Rice folk songs of Orissa

This popular belief is coroborated by an Oriya folk song:
"Megha barasila tupuru tupuru
Kesura maila gaja
Saru gacha mule bengatie basi
Bajae telingi baja."
i.e.,
"Drip drip rains the cloud
Sprouts the seeds all around
Sitting under the arum plant
The frog is beating the Telingi drums".
For rain making, the frog plays an important role in popular tradition.

File Courtesy: 
CRRI
18
Aug

Separation of Grains

1. Two methods of threshing are followed in Orissa. In one method the bundle of rice is beaten on a raised bamboo frame, and in the other the rice sheaves are threshed by the bullocks treading over them.
2. In this second method certain interesting practices are observed. Either on the first Thursday of the month of Margasira (Nov.-Dec.), or on the Dhanu samkranti day of the month of Pousa (Dec.-Jan.), the barn is cleaned, washed and plastered with cow dung.

File Courtesy: 
CRRI
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