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25
Jun

Wet Direct Seeding

1. In wet direct seeding, seed is normally pre-germinated prior to broadcasting onto recently drained, well-puddled seedbeds or into pre-standing water in the fields. 2. Wet direct seeding more commonly used in irrigated areas.
25
Jun

Dry Direct Seeding Limitations

1. Good land preparation, levelling and water management are needed for uniform crop establishment. Weeds are a major problem and their control is critical to get high yield.

2. Problems of rats, birds, mole crickets, ants and Nematodes can also be a problem especially in non-flooded fields.

3. Heavy rainfall at the time of crop establishment can result in crop establishment failure (especially in heavier clay soils) and if water sits over seed still germinating below the soil.

25
Jun

Dry Direct Seeding in irrigated areas

1. Use less - 60-80 kg - of good seed of a variety suited for direct seeding. Fertilizer can be added as basal.
2. Irrigate after sowing (if no rain). Let the water drain before flash flooding after 2-3 days to keep seed moist and to reduce soil crusting (this is especially important in the dry season).
3. If water is drained from the fields after broadcasting, it is re-introduced 10 to 15 days after the crop is established.
25
Jun

Dry Direct Seeding in rainfed systems

1. Small outlets can be made across the field to help drain the field and avoid snail damage and seed emergence problems in areas where water may stand.

2. Use sufficient seed of a variety suited for direct seeding to achieve a plant population of 100-150 plants/m2. This will usually require around 120-150 kg seed/ha. Farmers often use more seed (e.g., up to 150-200 kg/ha) because of poor field levelling, poor seed and seed loses to birds and rats.

3. Sow the seed uniformly. For

25
Jun

Dry Direct Seeding in rainfed Rice ecosystems

1. Small outlets can be made across the field to help drain the field and avoid snail damage and seed emergence problems in areas where water may stand.

2. Use sufficient seed of a variety suited for direct seeding to achieve a plant population of 100-150 plants/m2. This will usually require around 120-150 kg seed/ha. Farmers often use more seed (e.g., up to 150-200 kg/ha) because of poor field levelling, poor seed and seed loses to birds and rats.

3. Sow the seed uniformly. For

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