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24
Jun

Allelopathic effect of rice on weeds

1. The allelopathic potential of weeds through the release of toxic substances into the environment either by root exudation or from decaying plant material has been demonstrated in about 90 species (Putnam 1986). 2. Rice germination, growth and yield were significantly reduced by leachates from C. rotundus and this inhibition might be due to the presence of allelopathins. Among the whole plant extracts of Lantana camara, Cyperus rotundus, Ageratum conizoides, Echinochloa crusgalli, Commel

24
Jun

Allelopathy mechanism

1. Allelopathic compounds are released directly or indirectly into the rhizosphere by leaching, residue incorporation and decomposition, volatilization, root exudates etc. Research indicates that bio chemical interaction takes place when allelochemicals produced by one plant escape into environment and influence the growth and development of another plant. 2. Demonstrating allelopathic phenomenon is difficult because of the complexity of events involved. Laboratory bioassays are important b
24
Jun

Allelopathy

1. Plants are known to release chemicals into the environment by several means which, depending upon edaphic and climatic factors, may influence the growth of neighbouring species. 2. This phenomenon could be exploited for the development of eco-friendly (nonchemical) weed management through the use of a. allelopathic cover crops, b. allelochemicals as natural herbicides, c. allelopathic crops cultivars. 3. From olden days, certain cultivated crops or individual plants such as buckwhe
24
Jun

Biological Weed Control

1. Natural or biological weed control agents are those of biological origin, which suppress or kill the weeds without significantly affecting the desirable plants. They include insects, animals, fish (like Chinese carp), snails, birds (like duck), microbes (fungi, bacteria, viruses, nematodes, etc.), their toxic products, and plants (parasite plants, competing plants) or their products. 2. Experiments on rizi-pisciculture, in India and other countries have shown that herbivorous (macrophyto
24
Jun

Herbicide Tolerant (HT) / Genetically modified Crops

1. Crops that are normally susceptible to herbicides can be made into herbicide tolerant crops by employing biotechnological tools. Resistance genes for several herbicides have been incorporated into the genome of corn, cotton, canola and soybean. 2. USDA survey data revealed HT soybeans went from 17 percent of U.S. soybean acreage in 1997 to 68 percent in 2001 and 91 percent in 2009. Plantings of HT cotton expanded from about 10 percent of U.S. acreage in 1997 to 56 percent in 2001 and 71 p
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