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Rice in Indian Culture
 
India has the largest paddy output in the world and is also the second largest exporter of rice in the world. Paddy fields are a common sight throughout India, be they be northern gangetic plains or southern peninsular plateaus. The paddy cultivation plays a major role in socio-cultural life of rural India. Many festivals such as Onam in Kerala, Bihu in Assam, Sankranthi in Andhra Pradesh, Thai Pongal in Tamil Nadu, Makara Sankranthi in Karnataka, Nabanna in West Bengal celebrates harvest of Paddy. Andhra Pradesh is historically known as the "Rice Bowl of India", while Thanjavur is historically known as the "Granary of South India" and the Rice bowl of Tamil Nadu. Nanchinadu was known as the rice bowl of the former Kingdom of Travancore. In Kerala there is a place (which spreads into three districts) called Kuttanadu, which is famous for paddy cultivation. Kuttanadu is called the rice bowl of Kerala.
 

17
Aug

Diari Festival of chhattisgarh

1. While the general masses use to celebrate Diwali as usual in the month of ‘Kartik’ of Hindu Calendar, in accordance with the tales of Lord Rama as the festivity of joy and gaiety with resonances of crackers and fireworks by litting ‘Candles (Deepaks’ the tradition in and around the houses, but here the tribal masses use to celebrate their traditional festivity ‘Diari’, literally bearing the meaning similar to Diwali, but their mode of offerings and rituals is different and is being celebrated in between ‘Kwar and Kartik’ months of Hindu Calendar.

File Courtesy: 
IGKV, Raipur
18
Aug

The Plough and the First ploughing rituals

1. The first ploughing of the field in Orissa is usually done on an auspicious day. For this function the first or the fifth day (Sri Pancami) after the bright moon day of Magha (Jan.-Feb.) or the day after the bright moon day of Plzalguna (second half of March) is preferredg.
2. On this day the plough is washed, vermilion and sandal paste marks are made on its handle. Bhoga or food made of chena or cheese and gzrda or molasses is offered to itlo. Then the ploughman goes to the field and ploughs two and a half furrows, commencing at the northwest corner of the field.

File Courtesy: 
CRRI
18
Aug

Sowing of Seeds rituals

1. Usually the sowing of seeds starts on the third day of the bright fortnight of the month of Baisakha (second half of April). This day is known as Akshaya Trutiya, i.e., unperishable third day.

2. Preceding this day, the plough, the Akshi Muthi Tokei or the basket in which the seed is placed and worshipped (before taken to the field), the Gaulzi (small baskets like a measuring unit) are washed and painted with watered ricepowder.

File Courtesy: 
CRRI
18
Aug

Transplanting rituals

1. Seedlings prepared in a separate nursery bed are taken out and transplanted in the field during the month of Asadha (June- July).
2. Usually the transplanting is started on an auspicious day, preferably on Tuesday or Thursday or Friday. On the first day of transplanting, the cultivator transplants Saru gacha or arum plant in the field.
3. The rice seedlings are placed before the arum plant, and prayers are made to safeguard the new seedlings.
4. According to the belief of Brahmin priests, the arum plant represents Goddess Lakshmi. But the popular belief is different.

File Courtesy: 
CRRI
18
Aug

The worship of Bullocks

1. After the different aspects of cultivation are completed, the bullocks are shown respect in Orissa, on the full moon day of the month of Sravana (July-August').

2. The bullock shed is washed and plastered with cow-dung and mud. The walls of the shed are decorated with watered rice-powder.

3. During the night manda pitha or cakes made of rice flour are prepared. Seven cakes are offered to the pole, to which the bullocks are tied. These cakes are given to the bullocks and they are sumptuously fed.

File Courtesy: 
CRRI
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