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Rice in Indian Culture
 
India has the largest paddy output in the world and is also the second largest exporter of rice in the world. Paddy fields are a common sight throughout India, be they be northern gangetic plains or southern peninsular plateaus. The paddy cultivation plays a major role in socio-cultural life of rural India. Many festivals such as Onam in Kerala, Bihu in Assam, Sankranthi in Andhra Pradesh, Thai Pongal in Tamil Nadu, Makara Sankranthi in Karnataka, Nabanna in West Bengal celebrates harvest of Paddy. Andhra Pradesh is historically known as the "Rice Bowl of India", while Thanjavur is historically known as the "Granary of South India" and the Rice bowl of Tamil Nadu. Nanchinadu was known as the rice bowl of the former Kingdom of Travancore. In Kerala there is a place (which spreads into three districts) called Kuttanadu, which is famous for paddy cultivation. Kuttanadu is called the rice bowl of Kerala.
 

18
Aug

Bohag Bihu or Rangali Bihu

1. Bohag Bihu may be aptly called either a spring festival or New Year festival and this is a festival of joy and merriment although Various preparations of rice are made to celebrate it, the intensity of eatables is, however, not as prominent as that of Magh Bihu. Bohag Bihu is celebrated by all the communities in different names such as Baisagu by the Bodo-Kacharis, Baikho by the Rabhas, AIi-ai-ligang by the Misings, Bisu by the Deuri-Chutyas, Busu by the Dimasas etc. (Datta et al., 1994).

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu

1. The winter festival - Magh Bihu or Domahi of Assamese is a festival of enjoyment. It is post-harvest winter festival. It marks the gathering of harvest (Barua, 1957).
2. Magh Bihu is also known as Bhogali Bihu or the Bihu of enjoyment. A fire ceremony is closely associated with Magh Bihu, but more significant is Uruka- the Bihu eve (Goswami,1995).

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Kati Bihu

1. The Kati Bihu held in autumn with great significance concerning protection of rice crop in the field. The Kati-Bihu marks the completion of sowing and transplanting of rice (Barua, 1957).
2. In some areas of Darrang, Assam it is also known as Ada-Bihu another aspect of Kati Bihu is that the ploughman does certain things For the protection of his crop.
3. He plants a small bamboo in the field and lights an earthen lamp at its foot. He may also whirl a piece of bamboo and chant certain mantras to protect the maturing rice crop from insect pests.

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
18
Aug

Kati-puja

1. Kati-puja is a festival in Goalpara district of Assam. The folk God of Goalpara, Kati or Kartikeya is the God of fertility and human fecundity. He is the giver of sons and crops especially rice crop.
2. The Hudum puja prevalent in Goalpara region is observed by the. village folk. Hudum. according to a belief current in Goalpara region, IS a ram giver deity.

File Courtesy: 
ICAR NEH
20
Nov

Proverb related to rice in Kannada

  

“Akki mele aase nenatara mele preeti”

          Literal: “Desire over rice; love over relatives”. If one does not like to spend the rice he has at home but is equally interested in serving his quest/relatives well, one faces a dilemma.

          Meaning: This is used to describe the dilemma that people sometimes face when they have to give up something they like in order to obtain another item. When the objects are to have but only one can be had. The dilemma one faces is described with this gaade.

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