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Package of Practices
  • A compendium of state specific and location specific recommended package of practices are provided under this head. You may be interested to see that, thanks to our IP based customisation, that only your state (the state from where you are accessing RKMP) specific information is available.
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04
Aug

Bacterial leaf streak

1. This is a bacterial foliar disease. The disease first starts on the leaves as small water-soaked to translucent interveinal streaks of 1-10 cm long. They elongate parallel to the veins and turn yellowish brown, which often coalesce to form large blotchy lesions covering the entire leaf Surface. Minute, yellowish orange beads of bacterial exudates appearing all along the lesions is a characteristic feature of this disease. This disease is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. oryzicola. The bacterium is a rod shaped, 1.0-2.5 x 0.5-0.8\ in size and motile by single polar flagellum. It is gram negative and non-spore forming bacterium. To eradicate the disease, following steps should be taken 1. Procurement of seeds from authentic source to minimize the seed borne inoculums. 2. Soaking ofthe seeds in 0.025% Streptocycline and hot water treatment at 52°e for 30 minutes . 3. Use of resistant varieties.
04
Aug

control measures of the Bacterial leaf blight

1. Spraying with copper fungicides (Blitox 0.3%) alternately with Streptocycycline (250 ppm). 2. Application of moderate dose of nitrogenous fertilizer (80 kg/ha) and use of wider spacing (30 x 15 cm) . 3. Growing resistant varieties to the disease .
04
Aug

Bacterial leaf blight

1. This disease occurs mostly in low altitude areas of Tripura, Meghalaya and Arunachal Pradesh during July to September. The disease is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. Oryza. 2. The bacterium induces either wilting of plants or leaf blight. Leafblight phase is most commonly seen and typical symptoms are yellow to straw coloured stripes with wavy margins, generally on both edges of the leaves. These stripes start from the tips, extend downward and cover the entire leaf. The blighting may extend to the leaf sheaths and culms, killing the tiller or whole clump. 3. The phase usually appears 4-6 weeks after transplanting. The most destructive phase of the disease is 'kresek' or wilt resulting from early systemic infection. The leaves roll completely, droop and turn yellow and grey and ultimately the whole plant wilts and dies. 4. The kresek affected clumps may be confused with stem borer attack. However, borer affected tillers can be easily pulled out, which is not so in kresek' affected tillers. To distinguish 'krisek'; symptoms from stem borer damage, the lower part of the plant should cut off and squeeze between the fingers. Yellowish bacterial ooze will appear at the cut ends if the kresek is present. 5. Primary infection may result from diseased seeds, stubble, straw, and weed hosts such as Cyprus rotundas, C. deforms and Leticia exedra. 6. Thebacteria enter through hydathodes or wounds of the plant. It multiplies in the plant and becomes systemic in vascular bundles causing plugging of the water-conducting tissue, which results in wilting of plants. 7. The bacteria disseminated through irrigation water and wind-borne rain. The disease spreads fast under favourable weather conditions like incessant rains, strong wind and warm temperature (22-26°C). Plants in shade and close-planted crops supplied with high doses of nitrogen show more disease incidence.
04
Aug

Grain discolouration

1. Discoluration of rice grains. is becoming a major problem in certain varieties of rice both in upland and lowland conditions. It redUces the germination, causes decay of seedlings, produces chaffy grains and lowers the consumption quality of the grains. 2. The disorder may be limited to individual grains, but in severe cases almost the entire panicle including the rachis becomes discoloured. 3. Drechslera oryzae, Fusarium sp., Nigrospora oryzae, Penicillium sp., Curvularia sp., Sarocladium oryzae and Rhizophus sp. are associated with the discoloured grains. Heavy nitrogenous fertilizers increase the discolouration of grains. Grain discoluration may be checked by- • Spraying of 0.1 % Carbendism at the time of panicle emergence • Clean cultivation Growing resistant varieties
04
Aug

Bunt

1. In this disease, a few grains in an ear are affected, the infection being either partly or wholly. The symptoms appear first as minute black Streaks bursting through the glumes at the ripening. 2. If the infected grain is crushed between the fmgers, a black powdery mass of spores emerges. The causal organism of the disease is Tilletia barclayana. 3. The is that develops inside the grain is filled with spores, which are spherical and dark, with a spiny epispore. The spore germinates and produces sporadic. These produce secondary sporadics in large numbers. 4. The teliospores survive in the soil or seed and remain viable for next season. High doses of nitrogen fertilizers make the plant susceptible to the disease. 5. Early maturing varieties suffer more than the late maturing ones. Warm temperature (20-30DC) and high relative humidity (8S% and above) or intermittent rain at the time of ear emergence favours the disease development. The disease control measures include • Field sanitation • Crop rotation • Use of resistant varieties
04
Aug

Narrow brown leaf spot

1. This is also a minor disease and symptoms are brown coloured to dark coloured linear spots appear on the leaf blades. Spots may also OCCur in the leaf sheath, glume and parts of the stem. 2. Incidence of this disease is due to Cercospora oryzae. The pathogen produces conidia, which are hyaline or dark, filiform and several-celled. 3. Infected plant debris acts as primary source of infection and the disease spreads by means of air-borne conidia produced on the leaves. Control: • Destruction of infected plant debris by burning • Spraying of 0.2% Dithane M-4S with the appearance of the disease
04
Aug

Leaf smut

1. This is a minor disease and is characterized by appearance of minute, sooty, dull, angular patches on the leaves, which represents the sori. In susceptible varieties, the fungus almost covers the entire leaf surface of the older leaves. 2. The disease is caused by Entyloma oryzae, which produces tel iospores and these are angular to globose, smooth-walled, light brown in colour. 3. The disease perennates through sori lying in infected plant debris. 4. Spores reaching the leaves near the soil level cause infection. High nitrogen enhances the disease incidence. Control of the disease may be achieved by: • Clean cultivation • Growing resistant varieties
04
Aug

False smut

1. The occurrence of this disease is believed to indicate a good year because weather favourable to the development of false smut also favours good crop production. The disease appears on the ears where individual ovaries are transformed into large velvety green masses of round to oval sclerotial bodies. As it gives the appearance smut sori, the disease has got the name as false smut. Only a few grains are infected in the spikelet. 2. The disease is caused by Ustilaginoidea virens, which forms rough, olive green, granular spores. Some of green spore balls develop into sclerotia. The fungus produces perithecium with certain asci. The ascospores are hyaline, filiform and unicellular. 3. The fungus over winters on wild rice and many grasses. Primary infection is by airborne ascospores and secondary infection is by chlamydospores, which are air borne. Usually no special control measures are necessary. Spraying of0.1 % Carbendazimjust before flowering reduces the disease incidence.
04
Aug

Sheath rot

Previously this disease was considered as minor disease, but now it appears in a major form in many rice-growing areas of NE region. spots developed on the uppermost leaf sheaths enclosing the panicle as grey coloured irregular brown margins. The young panicle remains in the leafsheath or emerges only partially. Grains remain unfilled or are discoloured. In severe cases, panicles may rot. The disease is caused by Acrocylindrium oryzae. The pathogen produces conidia, which are hyaline, single celled and cylindrical in shape. The fungus survives in the infected plant debris and infects the plant during crop season. The conidia produced on infected plants spread by wind and cause secondary infection. Hot humid weather favours disease development. Control measures of the disease include: • Destruction of infected plant debris by burning • Spraying of 0.2% Dithane M-45 or Dithane Z-78
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