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17
Apr

DRR Dhan 45 - The first zinc enriched rice variety of India

 

Technology 4:

DRR Dhan 45 - The first zinc enriched rice variety of India 

Technology Profile 

Utilizationof biofortified rice is a promising strategy helping the poor to meet their daily micronutrient requirement.

DRR Dhan 45, India’s first zinc - rich and high yielding variety was developed at ICAR-IIRR and released in India during 2015.

Developed from the cross IR 73707-45-3-2-3/ IR 77080-B-34-3, it is a biofortified semi-dwarf medium duration culture (~130 days) with non-lodging plant type and long slender grains recommended for cultivation in irrigated ecosystem yielding 5-6 t/ha.

It recorded 22 ppm Zinc in polished seed which is higher than the checks (Kalanamak: 20.4ppm) and Chittimuthyalu: 20.7 ppm).

It possessed good cooking quality traits namely intermediate amylose content (21.1%), intermediate ASV(3.5) and Gel Consistency (54 mm). 

Context 

Although rice is a major food crop, it is a poor source of essential micronutrients such as Zinc leading to hidden hunger (malnutrition).

Globally zinc deficiency is a major health problem affecting  nearly 17.3% of the population. It causes

stunting, reduced immunity, poor cognitive development and mortality among consumers.

Hence the genetic enhancement of rice with increased levels of Zn is a cost-effective strategy in combating  malnutrition.

The concerted efforts made for developing nutritious rice varieties at ICAR-IIRR during 2004

consequently led in the development of  DRR Dhan 45 (IET 23832), a  high yielding Zn rich variety (22ppm)  during 2015.

Empirical Evidences

•DRR Dhan 45 was notified at national level with 5-6 t/ha yield potential and average zinc content of 22 ppm in polished rice.

•Multilocation evaluation testing during 2013-14 in AICRP- biofortification trials showed its

superior performance in the states of Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh wherein it has

out yielded the popular yield checks namely Samba Mahsuri and IR 64 by a average yield margin

of 37.1% and 17.2% respectively.

•In Tamil Nadu, IET 23832 surpassed the Samba Mahsuri and IR 64 by a yield margin of 70.2% and

60.3% respectively.

• In Karnataka, it gave 47.8% and 24.5% more yield than Samba Mahsuri and IR 64 respectively.

•Similarly, IET 23832 outyielded Samba Mahsuri and IR 64 by a yield margin of 8.3% and 15.5%

respectively in Andhra Pradesh

•DRR Dhan 45  is  a  proof  of  concept  for  Biofortification  and  can  address  the  hidden  hunger 

or mineral malnutrition, thus targeting  nutritional security of the nation.

 

Practical utility/Scalability

 

• In India people depend mostly on polished rice based foods as daily diet which is generally

deficient in Zinc. Poor people can’t afford to buy supplementary foods as well as zinc fortified

processed foods to have adequate supply of Zn.

•Diet involving biofortified rice helps in meeting daily requirement of Zn (7–13 mg per day for

adults) and thereby improving the  health of human beings.

• Also consumption of biofortified rice cuts down the expenses otherwise incurred on

supplementation and fortified foods of Zn particularly among the poor people. Hence consumption

of DRR Dhan 45 is alternative to mitigate  Zn malnutrition.

 

Technology / Concept developed by Dr.  V. Ravindra Babu and team

Related Terms: EISProduction Know How
17
Apr

DRR DHAN 44 –High yielding Rice Variety for water limiting areas


Technology 3:
DRR DHAN 44 –High yielding Rice Variety for water limiting areas


Technology Profile 

Rice variety DRR Dhan 44 (IET 22081) is released in the year 2014 for cultivation under irrigated conditions for the states of Uttarakhand, Haryana and Bihar. 

It is an early duration; drought tolerant, high yielding and long slender grain variety suited both for transplanted and direct seeded aerobic cultivation with good weed competitive ability. 

Context 

The drought tolerance in rice is very complex, controlled by quantitative traits and is the very reason for poor progress of breeding under drought prone rainfed and low land areas. DRR Dhan 44 was developed by Indian Institute of Rice Research, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, under the IRRI-India project on Stress Tolerant Rice for Asia and South Africa (STRASA). Though DRR Dhan 44 is released for cultivation under irrigated conditions, it is characterized by very high yield under limited water conditions.   

Empirical Evidences 

•At different locations across the country, it had shown yield advantage over national or regional or local checks viz., of 25.4 over Sahbhagidhan and 31.1% over Narendra 97 on overall basis, 9.8% over Pant Dhan 11 in Uttrakhand, 31.97% over Govind in Haryana, 34.72% over both Prabhat and Rajendra Bhagvati in Bihar. 

•It has desirable grain quality characteristics and several other desirable traits. DRR Dhan 44 is resistant blast, moderate resistant to other diseases and pests such as bacterial leaf blight and plant hoppers. 

• It has tolerance to drought at reproductive stage and also has high nutrient use efficiency. 

Practical Utility/ Scalability 

DRR Dhan 44 is characterized by very high yield under limited water conditions. Recently farmers harvested 8 tonnes/ha in Telangana state during Rabi 2015. It is doing exceedingly well under dry direct seeded conditions (sprinkler irrigation) with minimal inputs. 

Success story of Nandaram Farmer –DRR Dhan 44 cultivation with sprinkler irrigation- Kharif 2015                                                                                                                                                                 

Progressive farmer Mr Gopala Reddy of Nandaram village in Mahaboobnagar District of Telangana state cultivated DRR Dhan 44 in one acre of land. Actually, his land was not amenable for rice cultivation and the area was facing acute water shortage during that period. Mr Gopala Reddy had used limited resources for DRR Dhan 44 cultivation and practiced alternate wetting and drying with sprinkler irrigation. He had harvested 2.5 tonnes of DRR Dhan 44 and was extremely happy with DRR Dhan 44 culitvaiton. From his experience, he encourages many other farmers to cultivate DRR Dhan 44. Though released for irrigated ecology, DRR Dhan is well suited for areas with scarce water resources. 

Performance of DRR Dhan 44 in FLDs and Head to Head Trials during Kharif 2016

Field level demonstrations were conducted during Kharif 2016 to demonstrate the yield advantage of DRR Dhan 44 over mega variety MTU 1010 in Buchiguda village of Farooknagar Mandal of Mehaboob Nagar district of Telangana state. A total of nine farmers (G. Venkat Reddy, G. Narender Reddy, R Mallesh Goud, P Venkat Reddy, K Venkataiah Goud, K Venkatesh, Lakshminarayana Reddy, A Domodhar Reddy and G Narsimha Reddy) cultivated DRR dhan in a total of five hectares. On an average, the yield advantage of DRR Dhan 44 over MTU 1010 was 11.67%. Farmers were satisfied with its cultivation, its high yield and quality and are continuing with its cultivation during Kharif 2017. 

 In Head to Head trial conducted at Chinna solipet of Shabad Mandal in Rangareddy district of Telangana state, Mr Harikrishna Reddy harvested DRR Dhan 44 with a yield advantage of 25% over popular local variety MTU 1010. 

Widespread cultivation of DRR Dhan 44 

The demand for breeder seed of DRR Dhan 44 is gradually increasing since its release. Widespread cultivation of DRR Dhan 44 is seen as evident from seven times increase in the breeder seed indent from 2015-16 to 2017-18 

Technology / Concept developed by Dr.  T Ram and team

Related Terms: EISProduction Know How
17
Apr

Inaugural session of 53rd Annual Rice Research Group Meeting

9
Apr

Dr. Shaik N Meera's Latest Talk at NCPGS Conference,Agricultural College, Bapatla 2018

Video Url: 
See video

 

2
Apr

Hon'ble Vice President of India visited Indian Institute of Rice Research on 31 March, 2018

 

Event Date: 
Mon, 2018-04-02 12:00
6
Feb

Shaik N. Meera latest talk on Disruptive Extension

Video Url: 
See video

 

9
Jan

Innovation Evidence Hub Demonstration under IIRR - IRRI collaborative project on 3rd January, 2018

 

Event Date: 
Mon, 2018-01-01 13:00 - Sat, 2018-03-31 23:00

designer-rice

                                    
1. Rice and the global economy:  Designing rice   to     meet     social,     economic    and environmental challenge- Zeigler RS.

 

Genomic Resources: Status

 2. The  international   Oryza  map  alignment project: Development and analysis of a genus-wide comparative genomics platform to help solve the 9 billion people question - Wing RA, Chen M, Gao L, Han B, Henry R, Hsing   Y,   Kurata   N,   Oliveira,   Olivier   AC, Panaud O, Wang W, Brar D, Jackson S, Jena K, Long M, Machado C, Sanderson M and Ware D.

3. Transcriptome resources for function analysis and genetic enhancement of rice - Agarwal P, Parida S, Kothari KS, Sharma G, Baranwal V, Kapoor S and Tyagi A.

4. Allele   mining   and   deployment   for   rice improvement through sequencing and SNP genotyping: status and potential Thomson MJ.

Tailoring Rice by Design: Finding New Yield Thresholds

 

5. Finding   new   yield   thresholds   through changing concept  of  plant  type  in  rice  - Siddiq EA, Reddy CK, Zaman FU and Muralidharan K.

6. The   nature   of   green   revolution:   A   re- evaluation - Fan Z, Ali J, Xu JL, Gao YM and Li Z-K.

7.  Breeding for yield potential and enhanced productivity across different rice ecologies through green super rice (GSR) breeding strategy Ali J, Xu JL, Gao Y, Fontanilla M and Li ZK.

8.  Breeding rice hybrids by design for future - Viraktamath BC, Neeraja CN, Sundaram RM, Sarla N and Hariprasad AS.

9. Increasing  rice  yield  using  wild  species  Sarla N, Jyothi B and Siddiq EA

10. Harnessing  advances  in  rice  genetics  and genomics for unraveling genes and QTLs governing yield and yield components for developing designer rice - Singh AK, Gopalakrishnan S and Ellur RK.
11. Designing  high  yield  rice:  Prospects  and caveats - Vemireddy LR and Srividhya A.


                                            Engineering Starch Biosynthesis 


12.  Redesigning starch metabolism to increase rice yields - Hwang S-K, Tuncel A and Okita TW.

13. Designer  rice:  improvement  of  source  to sink in rice for higher yields - Madana MR, Ambavaram MM, Krishnan A, Batlang U, Venkategowda R, Srivastava S, Baisakh N and Pereira A.

14.  Genetic    modification    of    trehalose metabolism in cereal crops to improve grain yield - Garg AK, Kim JK, Owens TG, Kim H-J, and Kochian LV.

15.  A physiological approach  to  design  rice panicle architecture in the quest for high grain yield - Mohapatra PK.

16.  Biosynthesis and modification of starch by genetic engineering with reference to rice - Raghavendra AS.

                          True Breeding Apomixis

17.  Apomixis:    current    status    and    future prospects Goel  S and Siddiqi I.

18.  SSH  and  microarray  studies  show  strong association of heat shock proteins and other stress related transcripts with nucellar polyembryony in Citrus sinensis (L) Osb. - Kumar V, Malik SK, Pal D, Srinivasan R and Bhat SR.

                                     Defending Against Stresses: Biotic Stresses

19.  New   insights   into   rice   blast   resistance provide novel strategies for developing durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae Liu J and Wang G-L.

20.  Engineering disease resistance in rice Roy- Barman S and Chattoo BB.

 

21.  Extensive variation in alleles of Pi54 makes this  gene  show  broad-spectrum  resistance to blast - Sharma TR.

 

22. Prospects of engineering virus resistance in rice: achievements and opportunities - Dasgupta I.

23. New    genetic    avenues    for    insect    pest management in rice as revealed by studies on gall midge - Bentur JS, Rawat N, Sinha DK, Nagaraju J and Nair S.

24. Use of Vip3A-like insecticidal toxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis to develop designer rice cultivars resistant to lepidopteran pests - Gayen S, Hossain MA, Biswas PK and Sen SK

Defending Against Stresses: Abiotic Stresses


26. Changing  Honda  and  Toyota:  innovative molecular paradigms for drought tolerance in rice - Kohli A.


27. Designing genetic engineering approaches for salinity induced oxidative stress tolerance in (Oryza Sativa L) -  Gill SS, Singh S, Macovei A, Tuteja N.


28. Improving  rice  productivity  under  abiotic stress conditions Parida A and George S.

 

29. Towards   developing   transgenic   rice   for salinity and drought tolerance: role of Rab7-  Tripathy  MK,  Reddy  MK,  Deswal  R  and Sopory SK.

 

30. Molecular     breeding     for     submergence tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L) - Neeraja CN, Septiningsih EM, Collard BCY, Reddy JN and Mackill DJ.


                          Economizing Input Use: Nutrient and Water Use Efficiency

 

 

31. Predisposition  and  redesigning  of  genetic networks  of    rice    for   accommodating nitrogen-fixing rhizobial symbiosis - Reddy PM, Altúzar-Molina AR, Ortiz-Berrocal M, Medina-Andrés R, López-Sámano M, Martínez- Aguilar L and Velázquez-Hernández MDL.

32. Biological and synthetic sources of nitrogen – can they be complimentary? - Ladha JK.

 

33. Enhancing    water    use    efficiency    and effective use of water as a potential strategy to develop rice cultivars suitable for semi- irrigated  aerobic  cultivation  -  Sheshshayee MS, Mohankumar MV, Raju BR, Pratibha MD, Rajanna MP, Mohanraju B and Udayakumar M.

 

34. Activation tagging for mining novel genes in indica rice - Moin M, Bakshi A, Bharadwaj JP, Kumar ES, Kumar SV, Rao GSK,   Kumar GR, Rao TB, Ramesh B,  Rambabu B, Neetasri C, Mahendranath G, Rao KV, Balachandran SM, Sundaram RM, Anuradha G, Kumar MU, Siddiq EA and Kirti PB.

 

                                                    Nutrient Rich Wholesome Rice

 

35. Development   of   rice   and   maize   with multiple essential nutrients through simultaneous multi-pathway engineering - Zhu C, Farré G, Chao B, Rivera S, Arjo G, Sanahuja G, Zorrilla-Lopez U, Berman J, Capell T and Christou P.

37. Genetically engineered rice with iron and carotenoids - Datta K, Paul S, Ali N, Gayen D, Ghosh S, Karmakar A, Bhattacharya S, Sengupta S and Datta SK.

38. Engineering crop plants with seed storage protein for improved nutritional quality Narula K, Chakraborty N, Datta A and Chakraborty S.

39. Perspectives towards designing rice grain quality - Rani NS, Sheshu MM, Prasad GSV, Suneetha K, Babu VR, Rao LVS, Sundaram RM, Sivaranjani AKP and Srikanth S.

40.  Improvement   of   iron   and   zinc   in   rice varieties through conventional and molecular approaches - Babu VR, Neeraja CN, Longvah T, Surekha K, Usharani G and Viraktamath BC.

41.  Engineering a C4 rice - Quick WP.

42.  Research for better rice to cope with heat stress - Mittal D and Grover A.

43. Developing C4 rice: A   physiological perspective in relation to climate change - Voleti SR, Subrahmanyam D and Rao PR

44. Integrating transcriptome profiling, re- sequencing, high throughput SNP genotyping,  and  chemically  induced mutants for functional genomics of rice 
T. Mohapatra

 


29
Dec

Designer Rice

1. Rice and the global economy:  Designing rice   to     meet     social,     economic     and environmental challenges - Zeigler RS.

 

Genomic Resources: Status

 2. The  international  -  Oryza  map  alignment project: Development and analysis of a genus-wide comparative genomics platform to help solve the 9 billion people question - Wing RA, Chen M, Gao L, Han B, Henry R, Hsing   Y,   Kurata   N,   Oliveira,   Olivier   AC, Panaud O, Wang W, Brar D, Jackson S, Jena K, Long M, Machado C, Sanderson M and Ware D.

3. Transcriptome resources for function analysis and genetic enhancement of rice - Agarwal P, Parida S, Kothari KS, Sharma G, Baranwal V, Kapoor S and Tyagi A.

4. Allele   mining   and   deployment   for   rice improvement through sequencing and SNP genotyping: status and potential - Thomson MJ.

Tailoring Rice by Design: Finding New Yield Thresholds
 

5. Finding   new   yield   thresholds   through changing concept  of  plant  type  in  rice  - Siddiq EA, Reddy CK, Zaman FU and Muralidharan K.

6. The   nature   of   green   revolution:   A   re- evaluation - Fan Z, Ali J, Xu JL, Gao YM and Li Z-K.

7.  Breeding for yield potential and enhanced productivity across different rice ecologies through green super rice (GSR) breeding strategy - Ali J, Xu JL, Gao Y, Fontanilla M and Li ZK.

8.  Breeding rice hybrids by design for future - Viraktamath BC, Neeraja CN, Sundaram RM, Sarla N and Hariprasad AS.

9. Increasing  rice  yield  using  wild  species  - Sarla N, Jyothi B and Siddiq EA

10. Harnessing  advances  in  rice  genetics  and genomics for unraveling genes and QTLs governing yield and yield components for developing designer rice - Singh AK, Gopalakrishnan S and Ellur RK.

Next Page

 

25
Jan

Experience Next Generation RKMP

Experience Next Generation RKMP

 
 
Rice Knowledge Management Portal is now fully responsive. You can now view RKMP
on smart phones, tablets and more...
 
Click here to have a glimpse here while we move the content to the new site.

 

   
 

RKMP Mobile Apps

RKMP in collaboration with C-DAC Hyderabad is developing a series of mobile apps for the benefit of Indian Extension Professionals and Farmers. While the efforts are going on for developing mobile apps in local languages (like diagnostics, crop manager, fertimeter and ricecheck app), here are some of the ready to use apps. 

S.No Name Description Download Link
1 Rice Vocs App A ready reckoner for extension professional Get it on Google Play
2 Rice Crop FAQs Compendium of Kisan Call Centre Questions on Rice Get it on Google Play
3 RKMP E-Learning App With 20 e-courses for the benefit of Extension Professionals Get it on Google Play
4 Rice Innovations App Farmers Rice Innovations 2011 & 2015 Get it on Google Play
5 RKMP Extension Tools App More than 60 ready to use extension methods tool suit Get it on Google Play

  We appreciate receiving your feedback. Thank you supporting us!

The Rice Varietal Adoption Strategy

 INNOVATION IN SEED EVALUATION AND DELIVERY SYSTEMS:

THE RICE VARIETAL ADOPTION STRATEGY

Innovations in Seed Evaluation & Delivery Systems:

The Rice Varietal Adoption Strategy

The rice varietal adoption of STRASA has catalyzed a ‘demand-driven approach’ for stress-tolerant rice varieties (STRVs), creating sustainable delivery points, especially around seed delivery and extension systems in the agricultural extension system. These have improved varietal replacement and adoption rates through better access and availability of quality seeds of STRVs.

Evidence Hubs

Varietal evaluation and exhibition by way of IRRI’s ‘Evidence Hubs’ enhance the diffusion of new and upcoming STRVs among key stakeholders in the rice seed value chain.

Challenge

Slow adoption of new stress-tolerant rice varieties is caused by lack of awareness and knowledge on STRVs of extension staff and farmers, and lack of information by seed distributors on farmers’ demand.

Impact

Stakeholder interaction helps identify the preferred traits in rice varieties, and encourages selection and rapid adoption, while validating the typical seed demand in a region.

Evidence-based learnings from Evidence Hubs builds knowledge and improves awareness of seed dealers, distributors, producers, government & private market agents, and helps convey feedback to state authorities and policy makers.

A demand-driven seed system that has better varietal selection and sustainable, rapid adoption of STRVs was established
 

Head-T-Head Trials

IRRI is supporting head-to-head (H-2-H) trials, which are field evaluation in which one new STRV and one variety presently cultivated by a farmer are cultivated in the same field. Comparisons are drawn on yield performance and / or tolerance to different biotic/abiotic stresses, with all other farm interventions remaining constant.

Challenge

Seed diffusion in South Asia usually takes place via the informal seed system ‘farmer-to-farmer’ network. The conventional approach of field demonstrations of STRVs for farmers to encourage wider adoption of new rice varieties has limitation: farmers can only witness the outcomes during the demonstration, but are unable to see the gains that take place over time.

Impact

H-2H trials provide farmers with experiential learning, so they can make comparisons between rice varieties under their direct supervision and management.

This gives rise to improved decision-making by farmers, leading to better varietal adoption and faster diffusion through the informal seed system.

H-2-H trials facilitate a robust seed system, by ensuring that farmers have sustained understanding of varietal yield differences. This practice extends farmer buy-in beyond STRV adoption and catalyzes informal word-of-mouth endorsement among their networks, so other farmers can reap similar benefits.

Integrative Demonstrations

IRRI encourages integrative demonstrations that bring together key stakeholders, especially the seed dealers who liaise between farmers and seed suppliers. These demonstration plots are further used as ‘seed production plots’ and linked to the formal seed system networks. During integrative demonstrations, farmers are also trained in different aspects of quality seed production, certification and storage.

Challenge

Field demonstrations introduce farmers to new rice varieties that are suitable for specific soil and climate condition. However, most conventional demonstrations on large farm plots show rice varieties planted in ideal farming conditions, which makes it difficult for farmers from unfavorable rice-growing areas to compare stress-tolerant rice varieties with those grown in typical soil and climate conditions. Conventional demonstration plots must be linked with the seed system in order for it to showcase the benefits of new STRVs and of quality seed production, certification and storage to seed dealers and farmers.

Impact


The feed generated from integrative demonstrations help seed dealers and farmers improve their capacity to assess and address the seed demand and supply gap.

Linking demonstration plots to the formal seed system networks (public and private seed sectors) ensures local seed availability even in remote areas.

Training farmers during integrative demonstrations strengthens their capacity to produce quality seeds and enhance local seed security in the longer run. 

Dealer-led Demonstrations

IRRI encourages dealer-led demonstration plots, engaging seed dealers in the awareness and diffusion process of promoting STRVs. Making them better knowledge agents in the rice value chain helps pass on their feedback on demonstrated STRVs to farmers.

Challenge

Farmers are regular customers of dealers, agro-vets, and seed distributors, and often rely on them for information and knowledge on new seeds. Thus, seed dealers are key mediators and a crucial link in the dissemination of information on STRVs. Uniformed or misinformed seed dealers can negatively affect the adoption and dissemination of rice varieties, especially that of STRVs.

Impact

Dealer-led demonstrations are a promising method for improving STRV adoption rates and replacing older rice varieties.

As key mediators, seed dealers help in rapid dissemination of information and promote the adoption of STRVs among farmers while enabling better and new business prospects for themselves.

Encouraging Women Entrepreneurs with Training

Women farmers have strong social networks and linkages in the rice farming community. STRV seed generation, quality maintenance, storage, certification, and diffusion can be boosted by investing in the training and skill-building of women farmers and women’s self-help groups (SHGs)

Challenge

Women farmers have been traditionally engaged in seed production and preservation, and play a crucial role in the formal seed system and dealer networks in promoting STRVs. However, women do not have access to capacity-building activities that hone their skills and technical knowledge on quality seed production and storage.

Impact

Investing in and training women farmers encourage their leadership and entrepreneurship spirit, driving them to be ‘seed custodians’ in the farming community.

Local seed security and varietal replacement and improved when women SHGs are empowered

Providing women farmers with better skills and knowledge in seed and farming practices, contributes to improved livelihood security for their household and economic and social welfare in the community. 

Seed Cast

The IRRI-developed mobile app SeedCast is a web-based digital platform that enables forecasting of seed demand and supply.I helps dealers convey the seed demand of newly demonstrated varieties in a fast and efficient manner.

Challenge

Accurate and timely information on rice seed demand is needed for the planning, production, and supply of quality seeds to farmers.

Impact

SeedCast is an effective method of demand aggregation and information sharing for key stekholders, especially cooperative and private sector seed dealers, who make seeds available to farmers.

Sharing updated information on the demand and supply of STRVs and other seeds improves the varietal replacement process.

Up-to-date and relable information on rice seed varieties can be used by public and private seed corporations to improve their plan for seed production and supply
                          

 

 

 

STRVs

STRASA Varieties

Since 2007, IRRI, through the Stress-Tolerant Rice for Africa and South Asia (STRASA) project in partnership with Africa Rice, has developed and delivered rice varieties tolerant to abiotic stresses, benefitting nearly 18 million farmers in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa who cultivate rice in unfavorable environments

Drought-tolerant rice Varieties

Sahbhagi dhan / BRRI dhan 56 / Sukha dhan 3 (IR 74371-70-1-1)

Salient features: Releaseed in 2009, Sahbhagi Dhan is the first conventionally bred drought-tolerant variety for commercial cultivation in India. It has the potential to survive well under drought conditions due to its ability to take moisture from deeper layers of soil. It is resistant to leaf folder, whorl maggot, white backed plant hopper, brown plant hopper, gall midge, hispa thrips, leaf blast and rice tungro virus. This variety is released in India, Bangladesh and Nepal.

Parent variety: IR 554194*2/WAY RAREM
Duration in days: 105-110
Suitable land type: Medium and upland
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 95-105 cm
Yield: 4-4.7 t/ha 

DRR 42 (IR64-Drt1, IR 87707-445-B-B-RP 5208-3; IET 22836)  

Salient  features: DRR 42 is the improved version of the popular IR 64 variety. Along with drought-tolerance potential, it has an added advantage of high yield production. This variety is tolerant to drought, especially drought at flowering and grain filling stage, resistant to blast, moderately resistant to bacterial blight and brown spot.

Parent variety: Aday Sel/*3 IR 64
Year of notification: 2014
Suitable land type:  Medium or Upland
Grain type: Long slender
Plant height: 100-105 cm
Yield: 5-5.5 t/ha

DRR 43 (IR 83876-B-B-RP 5124-11-6-2; IET 22080

Salent features: This variety is the sister line of DRR 42 and has been released for commercial cultivation in India. Apart from good yield potential and drought tolerance, it has good grain quality and is resistant to blast, and moderately resistant to bacterial leaf blight, brown planthopper, and white-backed planthopper.

Parent variety: IR 03L03/IR 1148
Year of notification: 2014
Grain type: Long bold
Plant height: 100-105 cm
Yield: 4-5.0 t/ha
Suitable land type:  Medium or Upland

DRR 44 (IR 93376-B-B-130)

Salient features: It is the latest released drouth-tolerant rice variety in India & Nepal. This has excellent yield potential, good grain quality and also drought tolerance. It is resistant to blast, moderately resistant to bacterial leaf blight, brown planthopper, and whitebacked planthopper.

Parent variety: IR 71700-247-1-1-2/IR 03 L120
Year of notification: 2016
Duration in days: 120
Suitable land: type Medium or Upland
Grain type: Long slender
Plant height: 100-105 cm
Yield: 5-5.5 t/ha

Sukha dhan 5 (IR 83388-B-B-108-3) 

Salient features: Sukha dhan 5 is another high-yielding, drought-tolerant variety released in Nepal and India. It is resistant to stem borer and brown plant hopper.

Parent variety: IR8383B-B-108
Year of notification: 2014
Duration in days: 125
Suitable land: Upland
Grain type: Medium fine
Plant height: 89-105 cm
Yield: 4.5-5 t/ha

Sukha dhan 6 (IR 83383-B-B-129-4)

Salient features: Sukha dhan 6 has both submergence as well as drought-tolerant charateristics. This variety is released in Nepal and India. It is resistant to bacteria leaf blight, blast, and brown spot, stem borer and gall midge. 

Parent variety: IR83383-B-B-129-4 (IR 72022-46-2-3-3-2/IR57514-PMI-5-B-1-2)
Year of notification: 2014
Duration in days: 120-125
Suitable land:  Upland
Grain type: Medium fine
Plant height: 95-102 cm
Yield: 4.5-5 t/ha
 

BRRI  dhan 57

Salient features:  A drought tolerant variety released in Bangladesh. 

Parent variety: BR11, ICR 146-7027-224
Year of notification: 2010
Duration in days: 100-125
Suitable land: Medium and  Upland
Grain type: Slender
Plant height: 110-115 cm
Yield: 4-4.5 t/ha

BRRI  dhan 66(IR 82635-B-B-75-2)

Salient features:  A drought-tolerant variety released in Bangladesh.

Parent variety: IR 8875-176-B-2, IR 78875-207-B-3
Year of notification: 2014
Duration in days: 110-115
Suitable land: Upland
Grain type: Medium Slender
Plant height: 118-120 cm
Yield: 4.5-5 t/ha
 

BRRI  dhan 71

Salient features:  A drought-tolerant variety released in Bangladesh.

Parent variety: IR 55423-01 (NSIC RC 9), IIRR 148
Year of notification: 2014
Duration in days: 114-117
Suitable land: Upland
Grain type: Medium Slender
Plant height: 107-108 cm

Flood – tolerant rice varieties

Swarna-Sub1/BRRI dhan 51 (IR05F102)

Salient features:  Swarn-Sub1 has submergence tolerance of up to 2 weeks, due to the SUB1 gene. This variety is widely grown in flood-prone ecologies of Odisha, WB, Bihar and other eastern states of India along with Bangladesh.

Parent variety: Swarna*3/IR 49830-7-1-2-2,
Duration in days: 140-145
Suitable land: Low land
Grain type: Medium bold
Plant height: 100 cm
Yield: 5.5-6.5 t/ha 

BINA dhan 11 (Ciherang-Sub 1, IR09F436)

Salient features:  Swarn-Sub1 has submergence tolerance of up to 2 weeks, due to the SUB1 gene. This variety is widely grown in flood-prone ecologies of Odisha, WB, Bihar and other eastern states of India along with Bangladesh.

Parent variety: IRRI 149, Ciherang
Year of notification: 2015
Duration in days: 120
Suitable land: Medium or shallow low land
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 107-115 cm
Yield: 5.5-6 t/ha 

CR 1009-Sub 1 (IR07F291)

Salient features:  CR 1009-Sub 1 is one of the highest-yielding rice varieties. It can tolerate complete submergence for 2 weeks and is popularly used in south India for Idly, a local rice-based delicacy. This variety is the flood-tolerant version of CR 1009 (Savitri).

Parent variety: IR49830-7-1-2-1, CR1009
Year of notification: 2015
Duration in days: 150-155
Suitable land: Low land
Grain type: short bold
Plant height: 110-120 cm
Yield: 6-6.5 t/ha 

BRRI dhan 52

Salient features: This variety features submergence tolerance for up tp 2 weeks.

Parent variety: IR40931-33-1-3-2, BR11
Year of notification: 2010
Duration in days: 140-145
Suitable land: Low land
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 116 cm
Yield: 4.5-5 t/ha 

Samba mahsuri-Sub 1/BINA 12

Salientnt features: Samba Mahsuri-Sub1 is a fine-grain, medium-duration, flood-tolerant rice variety. It can tolerate complete submergence for up to 2 weeks. It is the flood-tolerant version of Samba Mahsuri (BPT5204), which is the largest non-basmati export rice variety in India. This variety is also relased in Bangladesh.

Parent variety: IR49830-7-1-2-2, Samba Mahsuri
Duration in days: 135
Suitable land: Low land
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height:80-85 cm
Yield: 4.5-5 t/ha 

Salinity-tolerant rice Varieties

CSR 36 (CSR 13/Panvel 2/IR36/IET 17340)

Salientnt features: CSR 36 is a medium-duration, salt-tolerant variety developed by CSSRI for inland salt affected areas of Uttar Pradesh.

Parent variety: CSR 13 /Panvel 2
Year of notification: 2005
Duration in days: 130-135
Suitable land/soil type: can tolerate up to pH
Range 9.7 and suitable for inland saline area
Grain type: long slender
Plant height: 110-112 cm
Yield: 5-5.5 t/ha 

CSR 43 (CSR-89IR-8)

Salientnt features: CSR 43 is a short-duration, salt-tolerant variety which matures earlier than other varieties. It helps in the timely sowing of wheat. This variety has a huge potential in sodic soil of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar.

Parent variety: KHAO DAWK MALI 105/IR 4630-22-2-5-1-3//IR 20925-33-3-1-1-28 IR49737-3B-28-2B
Year of notification: 2011
Duration in days: 110
Suitable land/soil type: can tolerate up to pH
Range 9.7 and has high potential in sodic soil and suitable for inland salt affected  area
Grain type: long slender
Plant height: 96-100 cm
Yield: 4.5-5 t/ha 

CR dhan 405 (CR 2577-1)

Salientnt features: This is an early-duration salt-tolerant variety released for cultivation in coastal saline areas of India.

Parent variety: IR2046-B-R-3-3-3-1
Year of notification: 2012
Duration in days: 110
Suitable land/soil type: suitable up to pH
Range 5.0-8.0 ds/M and for coastal saline areas
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 110 cm
Yield: 4.6 t/ha 

CR dhan 406  (CR2092-158-3; IET 19472)

Salientnt features: This is a long-duration, salt toelrant variety released for cultivation in coastal saline areas of India. It is resistant to yellow stem borer and moderately resistant to sheath blight and bacterial leaf blight.

Parent variety: Jaya / Lunishree
Year of notification: 2012
Duration in days: 150-155
Suitable land/soil type: suitable up to EC range
Range 5.0-8.0 ds/M and for coastal saline areas
Grain type: Short bold
Plant height: 120 cm
Yield: 5.0-5.5 t/ha 

DRR 39 ( Jag Jeevan )

Salientnt features: DRR 39 is a salt-tolerant variety released by the Directorate of Rice Research, Hyderabd ( DRR) for coastal area. It has a good grain quality and is resistant to blast and BPH, while being moderately resistant to WBPH. It is tolerant to both salinity and drought.

Parent variety: CSR3 / Kasturi
Year of notification: 2009
Duration in days: 130-135
Suitable land/soil type: Suitable for coastal saline areas
Grain type: Long slender
Plant height: 105-110 cm

Multi Stress-tolerant rice varieties

BRRI dhan 47 (IR63307-4B-4-3)

Salient features: A salinity-tolerant variety released in Bangladesh.

Parent variety: IR 51511-B-B-34-B/TCCP 266-2-49-B-B-3
Year of notification: 2007
Duration in days: 140-150
Suitable land/soil type:  coastal saline areas
Grain type: Medium bold
Plant height: 100 cm
Yield: 4.0-7.0 t/ha 

BRRI dhan 8

Salient features: This rice variety has salinity tolerance of up to 12ds/m.

Parent variety: IR 29/POKKALI
Year of notification: 2010
Duration in days: 130-135
Suitable land/soil type:  coastal saline areas
Grain type: Medium bold
Plant height: 90-95cm
Yield: 5.5-6.5 t/ha

BRRI dhan 55

Salient features: This rice variety features salinity tolerance of up to 10dS/m, moderate drought and moderate cold tolerance.

Parent variety: IR64, Oryza rufipogon
Year of notification: 2011
Duration in days: 145
Suitable land/soil type: Moderate coastal saline and medium upland areas
Grain type: Slender
Plant height: 100cm
Yield: 6.0-7.0 t/ha            

BRRI dhan 10 (IR64197-3B-14-2)

Salient features: This rice variety has salinity tolerance of up to 14dS/m.

Parent variety: IR42598-B-B-B-B-12/NONA
Year of notification: 2013
Duration in days: 145-150
Suitable land/soil type: coastal saline
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 95cm
Yield: 5.5-6.0 t/ha 

BRRI dhan 61 (BR7105-4R-2)

Salient features: This rice variety has salinity tolerance of up to 12dS/m.

Parent variety: IR64419-3B-4-3/BRRI dhan 29
Year of notification: 2013
Duration in days: 145-150
Suitable land/soil type: coastal saline
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 100cm
Yield: 5.5-6.0 t/ha 

BRRI dhan 67

Salient features: This rice variety has salinity tolerance of up to 14dS/m.

Parent variety: IR61247-3b-8-2-1/BRRI dhan 36
Year of notification: 2014
Duration in days: 140-150
Suitable land/soil type: coastal saline
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 100cm
Yield: 3.8-7.4 t/ha 

BRRI dhan 73

Salientnt features:  This rice variety has salinity toelrance of up tp 12ds/m.

Parent variety: BRRI dhan40/IR 61920-3B-22-1-1
Year of notification: 2014
Duration in days: 120-125
Suitable land/soil type:  coastal saline areas
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 120-125 cm
Yield: 3.5-6 t/ha 

BRRI dhan 79

Salientnt features:  This rice variety features submergence and stagnant wate tolerance for up to 2 weeks.

Parent variety: BRRI dhan49, BRRI Dhan 52
Year of notification: 2017
Duration in days: 135-140
Suitable land type:  Low land
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 110-112 cm
Yield: 5.5 t/ha 

CR dhan 801        

Salientnt features:  Released in India, this variety is tolerant to both submergence and drought..

Parent variety: IET 25667 ( IR 96322-34-223-B-1-1-1-CR 3955-2) IR 81896-B-B-195/2* IR05F102/IR 91659-54-35
Year of notification: 2017
Duration in days: 125-130
Suitable land type:  Medium Shallow
Grain type: Short bold
Plant height: 80-98 cm
Yield: 5-5.5 t/ha 

BRRI dhan 78

Salientnt features: Released in Bangladesh, this rice variety  has salinity tolerance of up to 8ds/m and submergence  up to 2 weeks.

Parent variety: IR 84645/IR 84649
Year of notification: 2016
Duration in days: 130-135
Suitable land type:  Tidal saline areas
Grain type: Medium slender
Plant height: 120 cm
Yield: 4.5-5.5 t/ha

 


7
May

IRRI - Drought -tolerant rice varieties

 Drought - tolerant rice varieties


5
May

IRRI stress tolerant rice varieties

 Drought - tolerant rice varieties

18
Apr

Alternate wetting and drying method of Irrigation for rice to enhance the productivity and water use efficiency

Technology 10: 

Alternate wetting and drying method of Irrigation for rice to enhance the productivity and water use efficiency

Technology Profile

Irrigated rice occupies 50% area and contributes nearly 70% to total rice production of the country with an average yield of 3.1 t/ha.  India’s food security largely depends on irrigated rice which consumes nearly 50- 60% of our finite fresh water resources. Flooded rice requires 900-2250 mm of water (average 1500 mm) depending on the water management, soil and climatic factors. 

  • Rice requires about 3000-4000 lts for producing 1 kg of grain
  • AWD is also called ‘intermittent irrigation’ or ‘controlled irrigation’
  • Alternate flooding Compared with the traditional continuous flooding system, AWD using lowland rice cultivars can reduce water input by 15-30% without any yield loss
  • It can be practiced with Bouman’s tube . 

Context 

Need – Water saving is must in rice as it consumes > 50% of irrigation water of crops Existing practices- Flooding the field and inundation of 5-10 cm in the feild requires more than 1500mm ha  

Potential losses: Water loss, Nutrient losses, soilpollution, reduced productivity 

Areas: In all rice growing areas in Telangana and Andhrapradesh especially borewell irrigated area where controlled irrigation is practiced 

Empirical Evidences

Demonstration yields and incomes 

  • AWD is also called ‘intermittent irrigation’ or ‘controlled irrigation’
  • Alternate flooding Compared with the traditional continuous flooding system, AWD using lowland rice cultivars can reduce water input by 15-30% without yield loss 

Practical utility/Scalability 

  • Saving in 30% of water input
  • Enhancing the water productivity
  • Reduced incidence of pests and diseases
  • Increase in productivity
  • Very easy to scale up
  • More than 500 farmers adopted it and found promising 

Technology / Concept developed by Dr. R.M. Kumar and team

Related Terms: EISProduction Know How
18
Apr

Modified Leaf Colour Chart for Enhancing the Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Reducing the Cost of Cultivation

Technology 9: 

Modified Leaf Colour Chart for Enhancing the Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Reducing the Cost of Cultivation 


Technology Profile 

Rice yields are decelerating or stagnating with indiscriminate use of chemical fertilizers, especially nitrogenous one due to its easy availability and cheaper cost causing environmental pollution and more incidences of pests and diseases. The tendency of increased application of N fertilizer is very common with our farmers, as they attribute the crop greenness and growth due to N application to yields of the rice crop.  Blanket   or package fertilizer recommendations   over large areas are not efficient because of indegenous nutrient supply varies among rice fields.  

  • Hence there is a need to synchronize N fertilizer application to plant needs to optimize nutrient use and minimize environmental pollution
  • The customized LCC developed at IIRR, Hyderabad on the basis of spectral evaluation of leaves of hundreds of varieties under different N levels can be used for real time N management by using the N application schedules (20-30 kg N/ha depending on the crop stage).

 Context 

Need: Balanced N application, timely application, as per the need of the crop Existing practices: General broadcasting and application of higher nitrogen (2-3 times more than  recommended Potential losses: Nutrient losses, soil pollution, enhancing the pests and diseases Areas: In all rice growing areas in Telangana and Andhrapradesh 

Empirical Evidences 

Demonstration yields and incomes 

Increased N fertilizer efficiency at high yield levels is possible in hybrids and high-yielding varieties using a chlorophyll meter and LCC to monitor leaf N status and guide fertilize N timing in irrigated rice. These methods not only reduced N requirement (25%) but also improved  congruence  of N supply  and crop demand than fixed timing of N application treatment 

Practical utility/Scalability 

  • Saving in cost of nitrogen by 25%
  • Improved soil health due to less Urea
  • Reduced incidence of pests and diseases
  • Most suited for irrigated rice system

Scalability: 

  • Already most of the State governments are supplying to Farming community
  • Very easy to scale up
  • Simple devise and practicable

Approximately 2 lakh farmers are using in the country in different stattes

Technology / Concept developed by Dr. R.M. Kumar and team

Related Terms: EISProduction Know How
18
Apr

SRI method for resource conservation, profitability and sustainable rice production

Technology 8:

SRI method for resource conservation, profitability and sustainable rice production 



Technology Profile 

The future of country’s rice production will depend heavily on developing and adopting strategies and practices that use irrigation water efficiently at the farm level.  System of Rice Intensification (SRI) is one such method which has a potential to produce more rice with less water.  Until 1990, the impression was that rice yields better only under flooded conditions. Hence, Water saving technologies in rice is the need of the hour and SRI method which had been tested for last one decade at IIRR and AICRIP programme is one technology which can save resources to more than 30%. 

Context 

Need: Increase productivity, reduced cost of cultivation, enhancing the soil productivity Existing  practices- Majority of the rice farmers practice flooded rice cultivation which consumes 1200 mm ha of water  Potential losses: Water losses, productivity and profitability to an extent of 30% 

Areas: In majority of the rice growing areas in Telangana and Andhrapradesh especially suited for Borewell 46% (DRR, 2005-2014) 

Empirical Evidences 

Demonstration yields and incomes 

SRI spaces rice plants more widely and does not depend on continuous flooding of rice fields. It uses lesser seed, chemical inputs and promotes soil biotic activities in and around the root zone, due to liberal applications of compost and weeding with a rotating hoe that aerates the soil. These changed practices with lower inputs lead to enhanced yields with considerable savings of inputs especially the water which is becoming scarce over the years. Grain yield increase by 10-25% and water use decreased by 29%. 

Practical utility/Scalability 

  1. Saving in seed cost to the extent of 60%
  2. Improved soil health due to use of orgnaics
  3. Reduced incidence of pests and diseases
  4. Eco-friendly method of rice cultivation
  5. Most suited for hybrid rice cultivation and quality seed production
  6. Already the Practice is followed in 53 countries across the world
  7. A million farmers in India are practicing the principles of SRI method

Technology / Concept developed by Dr. R.M. Kumar and team

Related Terms: EISProduction Know How
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